Mediations: Philip Young

  • Mediations comments on public relations theory and practice, with an emphasis on social media and communication ethics. Philip Young is project leader for NEMO: New Media, Modern Democracy at Campus Helsingborg, Lund University, Sweden. All views expressed here are personal and should not be seen as representing Lund University or any other organisation.

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    I have been in contact with Jo Bird, head of media and marketing for the British Transport Police, and outright begged her to get someone at the BTP to contact me. She promised to do what she could, but I have had no reply to the subsequent email I sent her in which I told her I had still not heard a thing. (I now have heard from the BTP, as I have blogged.) As a former head of marketing, I'm pretty surprised at the way Bird has half-handled my appeal to her.

    http://www.jackiedanicki.com/?p=961

    I want to hear some more about how trying to find these guys before they hurt somebody else is a "lynching."

    Thanks for the update, Jackie.

    Jim, I certainly haven't used the word 'lynching' on Mediations... As I have said, I am studying the way messages travel around the blogosphere from the perspective of an academic interested in PR ethics. From the outset I have tied not to comment (publicly) on Jackie's experience but that doesn't mean I have no sympathy for her experience, nor that I don't want to see it properly resolved.

    Ethics in PR should be pretty straightforward: Be transparent. Be truthful. Do not deceive. Listen at least as much as you talk. Not so different from the rest of life's ethics.

    Jackie, I am sure my students would prefer this short, sharp and and incisive analysis rather having to listen to me ramble on week after week!

    The problem is how to be truthful, how to be transparent... I regularly interview fine, upstanding practitioners who have wildly different views on what is ethical than, say, their own business partners.

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